Kitchen Garden

 

Importance of Kitchen garden

Vegetables occupy an important place in our daily life particularly for vegetarians. For a balanced diet, an adult should have an intake of 85 g of fruits and 300 g of vegetables per day. Considering the above facts, we should plan to produce our own vegetable requirements in our backyards using the available fresh water as well as the kitchen and bathroom wastewater.

Site Selection The size of a kitchen garden depends upon the availability of land and number of persons for whom vegetables are to be provided.  There is no restriction in the shape of the kitchen garden but wherever possible rectangular garden is preferred to a square one.  With succession cropping and intercropping, five cents of land would be adequate to supply vegetables for an average family of four to five persons.
Land preparation Firstly a through spade digging is made to a depth of 30-40 cm. Stones, bushes and perennial weeds are removed. 100 kg of well decomposed farmyard manure or vermicompost is applied and mixed with the soil. Ridges and furrows are formed at a spacing of 45 cm or 60 cm as per the requirement. Flat beds can also be formed instead of ridges and furrows.
Sowing and planting Direct sown crops like bhendi, cluster beans and cowpea can be sown on one side of the ridges at a spacing of 30 cm. Amaranthus (meant for whole plant pull out and clipping) can be sown after mixing 1 part of seeds with 20 parts of fine sand by broadcasting in the plots.  Small onion, mint and coriander can be planted/sown along the bunds of plots.  

Seeds of transplanted crops like tomato, brinjal and chilli can be sown in nursery beds or pots one month in advance by drawing lines. After sowing and covering with top soil and then dusting with 250 grams neem cake so as to save the seeds from ants. About 30 days after sowing for tomato and 40-45 days for brinjal and chilli and big onion the seedlings are removed from nursery and transplanted along one side of the ridges at spacing of 30-45 cm for tomato, brinjal and chilli and 10 cm on both the sides of the ridges for big onion. The plants should be irrigated immediately after planting and again on 3rd day. The seedlings can be watered once in two days in the earlier stages and then once in 4 days later.

The perennial plants should be located on one side of the garden, usually on the rear end of the garden so that they may not shade other crops, compete for nutrition with the other vegetable crops.

It may be observed from the above crop arrangements that throughout the year some crop is grown in each plot without break (Succession cropping) and where ever possible two crops (one long duration and the other a short duration one) are grown together in the same plot (companion cropping).

Cropping pattern
Plot No Name of the vegetable Season
01. Tomato and onion
Radish
Beans
Bhendi ( okra)
June - Sep.
Oct.-Nov.
Dec.-Feb.
Mar.-May
02 Brinjal
Beans
Tomato
Amaranthus
June - Sep.
Oct.-Nov
June - Sep.
May
03. Chilli and Radish
Cowpea
Onion (bellary)
Jun-Sep.
Dec.-Feb.
Mar.-May
04. Bhendi and Radish
Cabbage
Cluster beans
Jun.-Aug.
Sep.-Dec.
Jan.-Mar.
05. Bellary Onion
Beet root
Tomato
Onion
June-Aug.
Sep.-Nov.
Dec.-Mar.
Apr.-May
06. Cluster beans
Brinjal and beet root
Jun.-Sep.
Oct.-Jan.
07. Bellary onion
Carrot
Pumpkin (small)
Jul.-Aug.
Sep.-Dec.
Jan.-May
08. Lab lab (bush type)
Onion
Bhendi
Coriander
Jun.-Aug.
Sep.-Dec.
Jun.-Mar
Apr.-May

    Perennial plot

      Drumstick, Banana, Papaya, Tapioca, Curry leaf and Agathi.

Advantages
  • Vegetables obtained are fresh and superior in quality and not infected by germs from unsanitary markets.
  • Secures enough vegetable of all classes with cheap rate.
  • Cost of production is very low because most work done by family members
  • Save money
References http://www.indg.gov.in/agriculture/on-and-off-farm-enterprises/kitchen-garden